coffee-n-cats:

Chances that these two fetal bones are from the same individual? They weren’t too far apart… #bones #zooarchaeology

coffee-n-cats:

And articulated 3rd #pathology! Two tarsals, one pathology. Heh. #zooarchaeology #bones

coffee-n-cats:

My second #pathology! Partially healed TRS with anterior split along the vertical plane. Pressure fracture? Not sure. #bones #zooarchaeology

coffee-n-cats:

My first pathology!! #bones #pathology #zooarchaeology

coffee-n-cats:

48 right astragali, likely 50. It’s (almost) official. About half of them are nopros, but if George Frison thought they were all from the same context, I’m prone to believe him. #bones #zooarchaeology

Sacral segment from Carter-Kerr/McGee.

I should probably note that the artifact is not a caudal vertebra. The shape doesn’t fit.

coffee-n-cats:

I totally just found an ancient elk in a box.

Guess who finished her last cast?? I mean, now I have to go back and check a few things, but they’re done!

coffee-n-cats:

I can’t believe I managed to refit this thing. It was (and still is) in dozens of friable pieces. But now I can get fairly accurate measurements. Three hours well spent.

This cast was a mess, but I managed to completely finish it (ID/catalog/refit) in one 8-hour day.

Also, I found a baby bison metapodial. Hurray!

archaeoblogs:

On the Origin of Our Specimens: The Down YearsSource: http://bit.ly/1qYWJgU (image)‘The Thirteen’ The collection of specimens, known since 1997 as the Grant Museum of Zoology, was started in 1827 by Robert E. Grant. Grant was the first professor of zoology at UCL when it opened, then called the University of London, and he stayed in post until his death in 1874. The collections have seen a total of 13 academics in the lineage of collections care throughout the 187 year history of the Grant Museum, from Robert E. Grant himself, through to our current Curator Mark Carnall. Both Grant and many of his successors have expanded the collections according to their………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

archaeoblogs:

On the Origin of Our Specimens: The Down Years
Source: http://bit.ly/1qYWJgU

(image)‘The Thirteen’ The collection of specimens, known since 1997 as the Grant Museum of Zoology, was started in 1827 by Robert E. Grant. Grant was the first professor of zoology at UCL when it opened, then called the University of London, and he stayed in post until his death in 1874. The collections have seen a total of 13 academics in the lineage of collections care throughout the 187 year history of the Grant Museum, from Robert E. Grant himself, through to our current Curator Mark Carnall. Both Grant and many of his successors have expanded the collections according to their………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

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