archaeoblogs:

On the Origin of Our Specimens: The Down YearsSource: http://bit.ly/1qYWJgU (image)‘The Thirteen’ The collection of specimens, known since 1997 as the Grant Museum of Zoology, was started in 1827 by Robert E. Grant. Grant was the first professor of zoology at UCL when it opened, then called the University of London, and he stayed in post until his death in 1874. The collections have seen a total of 13 academics in the lineage of collections care throughout the 187 year history of the Grant Museum, from Robert E. Grant himself, through to our current Curator Mark Carnall. Both Grant and many of his successors have expanded the collections according to their………. Read MoreRead and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

archaeoblogs:

On the Origin of Our Specimens: The Down Years
Source: http://bit.ly/1qYWJgU

(image)‘The Thirteen’ The collection of specimens, known since 1997 as the Grant Museum of Zoology, was started in 1827 by Robert E. Grant. Grant was the first professor of zoology at UCL when it opened, then called the University of London, and he stayed in post until his death in 1874. The collections have seen a total of 13 academics in the lineage of collections care throughout the 187 year history of the Grant Museum, from Robert E. Grant himself, through to our current Curator Mark Carnall. Both Grant and many of his successors have expanded the collections according to their………. Read More


Read and find more great archaeology blogs at: Archaeology Blog Project

My very colorful bison showing the percentages of minimal animal units from my dissertation site.

Deliberately overly festive for my talk in May.

theolduvaigorge:

  • by Landon P. Karr
The remains of Terminal Pleistocene megafauna in North America represent a continent-wide case study in understanding the taphonomic processes that affect bones, and the use and reuse of bones among some of North Americas earliest inhabitants. The complex dynamics of bone fracture, bone degradation, and the effects of natural and cultural taphonomic processes present a challenge for interpreting the nature of fractured and fragmented zooarchaeological material in North America. The role of the environment in affecting bones and their suitability for use and reuse is profound. Natural processes affect the preservation of bones and their suitability for use, which presents an interpretive challenge for archaeologists examining fractured and fragmented remains. This paper seeks to explain, describe, and resolve some of the problems inherent in assessing and understanding the use and reuse of bones as raw materials, using evidence from two Terminal Pleistocene sites in North America (Owl Cave in Idaho, and the Inglewood site in Maryland) as case studies that highlight the cultural, environmental, and interpretive differences that are manifest in zooarchaeological (and paleontological) assemblages” (read more/open access).
(Open access source: Quaternary International in press, 2014)
oosik:

Child Burial: Museo de Sitio Teotihuacan, Mexico

oosik:

Child Burial: Museo de Sitio Teotihuacan, Mexico

kabwe1:

Degenerative changes of superior articular facets in lumbar vertebra (spondylarthrosis lumbalis).

 

kabwe1:

Cribra femora - porotic bone area on the anterior collum femoris - in a child (12 years old). This kind of pathological change usually indicates metabolic disorders, such as anemia.

coffee-n-cats:

This 9,000 year old trabecular bone is so fragile but so structurally preserved.

The search for the graves of the knights of Grunwald will begin this fall

archaeologicalnews:

Where exactly was the Grunwald battle fought, and is there a chance to find the graves of the knights at Grunwald - archaeologists will look for answers to these questions in autumn. The study will be a joint project of researchers from Poland, Denmark, Norway and Lithuania.

Museum of the…

Wait, what?

Top of Page